Voiceover Microphones

The very first microphone I bought was from a Tandy store in Blackpool in around 1983 for about £20. It was pretty rubbish and I only used it for singing. Since then - for music and spoken word - I've either owned or worked with an Audio Technica MBK4000,

M-Audio Nova, Rode NT1a, SE 2200a, Audio Technica AT2020 and AT2035, an AKG Perception 220 and quite possibly some others that I've simply forgotten about.

So, what do I use now and why do I use these particular models?   

Neumann TLM102

This is a surprisingly small but wonderfully big sounding microphone from the legendary microphone German manufacturers Neumann. When I decided to go full-time as a British male voice artist in 2012, I sold my Studio Projects C1 mkII and made the Neumann TLM102 my very first full-time voice artist purchase and I've used it on almost every recording session and job since. 

Why the TLM102? Neumann is synonymous with quality voiceover microphones - especially the famous U87 - and the TLM102 gives me that great Neumann sound and superb engineering that I know would last me for years to come. It's a great all rounder for voice artist work, is not too bassy and not too bright sounding (unlike it's big brother the TLM103 which didn't suit my voice).
 I love the TLM102 and I think it'll be in my studio until I retire! 
 

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Sennheiser MKH 416
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The newest addition to the studio is the Sennheiser MKH416. The MKH is a staple for voiceover work in many studios worldwide even though it's a shotgun style microphone that was originally designed for filmmaking and broadcast work. It's become a big favourite with many a voice artist around the world.


Why choose the MKH 416? Sennheiser is another highly respected manufacturer (they actually acquired Neumann in 1991). I'm aiming to use it primarily for voice jobs where the client wants something a bit more punchy and in your face (such as radio promos, voice acting, video game voiceover etc) as this is something this voiceover microphone excels at, though I feel sure that it would work well on pretty much any voiceover task.